top100insureres

European transport networks – the road to economic connectivity in Southeast Europe

The transport infrastructure of SEE consists of national transport systems and a number of integrated international networks that upon their completion should ensure quick and unhampered movement of people and goods across Europe. This makes the integrated European transport system a key prerequisite for the seamless operation of the internal market and for the economic, social and territorial cohesion of the European countries.

seecountryprofiles

2013: a year of readjustment and renewing commitments to sustainable growth for SEE

The global economic slowdown of 2012 was far sharper than expected and its impact on the economies of Southeast Europe turned the spotlight on the region’s structural weaknesses whilst also exacerbating the effects of the eurozone debt crisis. For these economies, 2013 is a year of readjustment and renewing commitments to creating robust and sustainable economic growth, an approach which is forecast to result in more promising rates of real output in 2014.

Top 100 companies

On the path of recovery

The economies of Southeast Europe set out on a hard and long road to recovery last year, trying to beat the challenge of sluggish demand for their exports in the eurozone, their main trading partner.
Unsurprisingly, the EU member states in the region fared worse than their non-EU neighbours due to their stronger integration with the western European markets. In contrast, non-EU member states capitalised on their looser links with the EU to post bigger growth in their gross domestic product (GDP).

SEE Top Industries

SEE: a land of promise for automotive industry investors

The International Organisation of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers (OICA) has said that 80.1 million motor vehicles were manufactured worldwide in 2011, a 3.1% year-on-year increase in global automotive production. The number of passenger cars produced rose to 59.9 million from 58.3 million in 2010.
The combined output of motor vehicles in the three Southeast European countries manufacturing them in 2011 – Romania, Slovenia and Serbia – fell by 9.5% from 2010 to 525,141 units.
Forecasts for the next three years indicate recovery for both global and European automobile production.

Jerome Olive

Unbeatable quality-price ratio, new models help Dacia weather crisis

Dacia, Romania’s first carmaker, was set up in 1966, when the Mioveni plant, in the southern part of the country, was built. France’s Renault currently owns 99.43% of Dacia. Dacia produces passenger vehicles such as Logan sedan, Logan MCV, Dacia Sandero and Duster and commercial vehicles such as Logan Van and Logan Pick-Up. In 2010, Dacia sold more than 348,000 vehicles, exporting most of its production to France (110,076 vehicles), Germany (40,500) and Italy (21,930).