Label-Top-100

Bottomlines under more pressure as competition intensifies

The slow recovery in the European Union, Southeast Europe’s (SEE) main trading partner, the sluggish prospects facing nearly all economies in the region and shrunken domestic demand all left their mark on corporate bottomlines in 2013. At the same time, long overdue structural reforms, fiscal and regulatory volatility and poor infrastructure continued to be a drag on local businesses. Against this backdrop, the performance of the companies in the SEE TOP 100 ranking was expectedly lackluster – their combined revenues in 2013 were flattish, with nearly half of the entrants seeing a decline in their revenues.

Label-Top-100

BSTDB to target multi-country projects, greater public sector engagement

The Black Sea Trade and Development Bank (BSTDB) is an international financial institution established by Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Georgia, Greece, Moldova, Romania, Russia, Turkey, and Ukraine. Its headquarters are in Thessaloniki, in Greece. BSTDB supports economic development and regional cooperation by providing loans, credit lines, equity and guarantees for projects and trade financing in the public and private sectors in its member countries. The bank’s authorised capital is 3.45 billion euro. BSTDB is rated long-term “A-” by Standard and Poor’s and “A2” by Moody’s.

seecountryprofiles

2013: a year of readjustment and renewing commitments to sustainable growth for SEE

The global economic slowdown of 2012 was far sharper than expected and its impact on the economies of Southeast Europe turned the spotlight on the region’s structural weaknesses whilst also exacerbating the effects of the eurozone debt crisis. For these economies, 2013 is a year of readjustment and renewing commitments to creating robust and sustainable economic growth, an approach which is forecast to result in more promising rates of real output in 2014.

SEE Colours

Moldova gives boost to microlending

Microfinancing, an increasingly popular lending venue in mainly rural Moldova, recently got a boost when the country’s financial regulator CNPF unveiled plans for the expansion of the combined credit portfolio of the microfinance organisations to 2.0 billion lei (131.2 million euro) by 2014 from 1.4 billion lei in 2009.
The plans are part of a broader strategy for the development of the financial market of the ex-Soviet country considered one of the poorest in Europe with GDP-per-capita of 23,083 lei in 2011, according to data from Moldova’s national statistics board.